Blog

  • by Beatrice Lei Chang
    Japanese Ceramics at the Art Gallery of South Australia
    Many pieces from our gallery were featured in this dynamic exhibition which spans Japanese modern & contemporary ceramics beginning in the post-war years to today. Click to read more!
  • The Art of Shigaraki

    A brief history of Shigaraki: One of the Six Ancient Kilns of Japan
    by Beatrice Lei Chang
    The Art of Shigaraki
  • by Beatrice Lei Chang
    松谷 文生が第39回田辺美術館大賞展の準大賞を受賞
  • Osaka University of Arts: Panel Discussion on the Avant-Garde Ceramics

    A Panel Discussion on the Avant-Garde Ceramics of Hayashi Yasuo, Yagi Kazuo, and Suzuki Osamu
    by Beatrice Lei Chang
    Osaka University of Arts: Panel Discussion on the Avant-Garde Ceramics
  • Asia Week New York

    A recap of our opening reception & more!
    by Beatrice Lei Chang
    Asia Week New York
  • 「前衛陶芸の時代・林康夫という生き方」

    坂上しのぶ氏の著書、「前衛陶芸の時代・林康夫という生き方」が出版。
    by Beatrice Lei Chang
    「前衛陶芸の時代・林康夫という生き方」

    We are celebrating Hayashi Yasuo's recent feature in an important book featuring an extensive retrospective of Hayashi's artistic practice.

  • Art Gallery of South Australia & Dai Ichi Arts

    AGSA will be featuring sculptural works acquired from Dai Ichi Arts in an upcoming Exhibition
    by Beatrice Lei Chang
    Art Gallery of South Australia & Dai Ichi Arts
  • by Beatrice Lei Chang
    林康夫氏が第40回京都府特別功労賞を受賞
  • The Legacy of Mingei & Murata Gen

    The social art history of Murata Gen's pottery
    The Legacy of Mingei & Murata Gen

    While we are excited to see new artists emerging on the stage of Japanese ceramic scene, we pause, and examine those who pioneered in the field; who looked into their own humble roots to be inspired. This is the work of Murata Gen, of Mashiko & Mingei...

  • by Beatrice Lei Chang
    The Montgomery Collection

    We’re delighted to announce that the important collector of Japanese ceramics, and our friend Mr. Jeffrey Montgomery will be exhibiting his collection of over 250 Japanese folk crafts in ceramic, wood, fabric, and lacquer mediums. Coming up this October, it will be the first major and extensive exhibitions of Japanese folk craft, including Mingei wares from Mashiko, outside of Japan in the last 50 years. It showcases the importance of the Montgomerey collection. The upcoming exhibition in the Museo Delle Culture in Lugano will showcase pieces that have passed through Dai Ichi Arts in recent years. 

  • Ayumi Shigematsu

    The Vanguard Generation
    Ayumi Shigematsu

    Ayumi Shigematsu (b. 1958) is part of a vanguard generation of highly influential post-war female artists in Japan whose practices are inspired by concepts of female sexuality and representations of nature. She studied with Suzuki Osamu 鈴木 治 (1926-2001) at the Kyoto University of Arts and as pioneer for women in a historically male-dominated pottery industry in Japan, she went on to work as one of few female professors teaching ceramic practice at her alma mater. Having studied with the pioneer of the Sodeisha ceramic movement, her propensity for sculptural rather than functional clay forms reflect key Sodeisha tenets. 

  • by Beatrice Lei Chang

    How can we tell the difference between Japanese and Korean ceramics? What is it in Korean ceramics that is absent from Japanese wares? Aloofness, sternness, a certain folk quality...it would take more space than we have there to get to the bottom of it, but pay close attention to the beautiful Korean Moon jars next time you visit the Victoria and Albert Museum, take a second look at the robust collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, or browse contemporary pieces at the San Francisco Asian Art Museum, and you might begin to get a feel for the distinctions between these two great ceramic cultures. 

  • by Beatrice Lei Chang

    Contemporary artist Kino Satoshi (b. 1987) is a young sculptor with a big vision who, like many Japanese ceramic artists, finds inspiration in nature and its powerful forces. His recent celadon series is titled Oroshi, which refers to a cold wind coming down from the mountains. This exemplary 2015 sculpture places the viewer in front of a perfectly balanced spiral form made by a cool mountain wind.

  • by Beatrice Lei Chang
    Good News from Hayashi!
  • Celadon

    The art of Yoshikawa Masamichi
    by Beatrice Lei Chang

    If the Song Dynasty's five kilns (Guan ware kiln 官窯, Ge ware kiln 哥窯, Ru ware kiln 汝窯, Ting ware kiln 定窯, and Jun ware kiln 鈞窯) represent the height of Chinese classic porcelain making, contemporary Japanese ceramics enjoy the same national status today within Japan and around the world. The work of Yoshikawa Masamichi (b. 1946) makes us ask whether contemporary Japanese ceramics might be more expressive and diverse than the Song Dynasty ceramics that inspire today’s artists. 

  • by Beatrice Lei Chang

    I think that among many professions and callings, the artist is a noble one. Throughout their live, these visionaries create arts to inspire, delight, and connect; when they are gone, their art and artistic legacy continue to teach, provoke and strengthen our bonds with each other. Wada Morihiro was a star that fell too soon. In 2009, a year after Wada left us, Dai Ichi Arts presented the exhibition Celebration of a Life, seen in the attached brochure with several of Wada's works that were exhibited for sale. Wada's ceramics still intrigue us over a decade after his passing, and we grow to understand him more.

  • Hayashi Yasuo

    Our 90 Years Young Hero
    by Beatrice Lei Chang
    Hayashi & his wife
    Hayashi & his wife

    Hayashi Yasuo 林康夫 (b. 1928) embodies the maxim "clay prolongs life," as he has been a practicing ceramic artist for over six decades. Today he even drives from Kyoto to Tokyo to attend his exhibitions! Age has never deterred this significant artist, who was one of founder of Shiko-kai 四耕会(1947), a precursor of the influential Japanese avant-garde ceramics group Sodei-sha 走泥社(1948), when he was only 19 years old. The art critic Kimura Shigenobu 木村重信(1925-2017) has identified Hayashi Yasuo's "Cloud" sculpture as the first totally non-functional ceramic work, which according to Kimura made Hayashi "the real forerunner in the field." This departure from traditional ceramic techniques freed future generations of Japanese ceramic artists.